Feb 022006
 

LiveScience.com is reporting today that a new study by neuroscientists at the University of California, Irvine has confirmed the long held belief that different pieces of a single memory are stored in separate locations in the brain. This is the first time solid evidence has been collected verifying that what we recognize as a single experience is actually saved in our brains as multiple memory fragments. The researchers believe their work will lead to insights into understanding and ultimately treating neurological disorders that affect memory storage, retention, and recall.

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Dec 202005
 

Researchers from MIT studying brain plasticity, the reorganization of brain cells and their connections over time, have recently discovered a “backtalk” or retrograde signal from post-synaptic to pre-synaptic neurons that plays a crucial role in synapse development. It has long been known that synaptic strength, the strength of the connections between neurons, plays a central role in learning and memory in neural networks. The scientists hope their work will lead to breakthroughs in understanding and fighting neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease.

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Dec 132005
 

A mouse

It was announced yesterday that in an effort to create better models for studying neurological disorders, a team of scientists from the Salk Institute led by Dr. Fred Gage have successfully bio-engineered mice to be born with a small percentage of human brain cells. The process involves injecting 2-week-old mouse embryos with roughly 100,000 human embryonic stem cells. The mice created could be a valuable asset to scientists as they struggle to understand and combat neurological disorders like epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease.

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