Mar 092016
 

This is going to be another one of my “selfish” posts – written primarily for me to refer back to in the future and not because I believe it will benefit anyone other than me. The idea is one that I always took for granted but had a hard time proving to myself once I decided to try.

Theorem: Suppose we have an M bit unsigned binary integer with value A. Consider the first (least significant) N bits with value B. Then:

A \equiv B \bmod{2^N}

Put another way, arithmetic with unsigned binary integers of a fixed length N is always performed modulo 2^N.
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Jan 122016
 

It is no big secret that exponentiation is just multiplication in disguise. It is a short hand way to write an integer times itself multiple times and is especially space saving the larger the exponent becomes. In the same vein, a serious problem with calculating numbers raised to exponents is that they very quickly become extremely large as the exponent increases in value. The following rule provides a great computational advantage when doing modular exponentiation.

The rule for doing exponentiation in modular arithmetic is:

a^b \bmod{c} = ((a \bmod{c})^b) \bmod{c}

This states that if we take an integer a, raise it to an integer power b and calculate the result modulo c we will get the same result as if we had taken a modulo c first, raise it to b, and calculate that product modulo c.

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Jan 022016
 

I must stay focused. I must stay focused. I must stay … I wonder what’s new on Facebook.

I don’t really feel like writing this post mostly because I know that it will be very similar to the other two I have already done: modular addition rule proof and modular subtraction rule proof, but my New Year’s Resolution is to follow things through to completion. Well, that would’ve been my News Years resolution if I had made one. Either way, it’s back to modular arithmetic.

The rule for doing multiplication in modular arithmetic is:

(a * b) \bmod{c} = (a \bmod{c} * b \bmod{c}) \bmod{c}

This says that if we multiply integer a times integer b and take the product modulo c, we get the same answer as if we had first taken a modulo c and multiplied by b modulo c and taken that product modulo c.

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Dec 312015
 

I’ve already presented and proved the rule for modular addition, so for a sense of completeness, but mostly to satisfy my OCD, now I’ll cover the rule for modular subtraction. When doing subtraction in modular arithmetic, the rule is:

(a - b) \bmod{c} = (a \bmod{c} - b \bmod{c}) \bmod{c}

If we subtract integer b from integer a and calculate the difference modulo c, we get the same answer as if we had subtracted b modulo c from a modulo c and then calculated that difference modulo c. Like the modular addition rule, this rule can also be expanded to include multiple integers. Continue reading »

Dec 312015
 

Addition in modular arithmetic is much simpler than it would first appear thanks to the following rule:

(a + b) \bmod{c} = (a \bmod{c} + b \bmod{c}) \bmod{c}

This says that if we are adding two integers a and b and then calculating their sum modulo c, the answer is the same as if we added a modulo c to b modulo c and then calculated that sum modulo c. Note that this equation can be extended to include more than just two terms. Continue reading »