Jan 042017
 

GIMP logo

In my last post, I briefly explained GIMP‘s scripting and plug-in system and the two most common ways to program custom extensions and scripts: Script-Fu and Python-Fu. Script-Fu, being the older of the two options, is well documented and the more widely used of the two. Not because I love the road less traveled, but because I love Python, I have chosen Python-Fu, a set of Python modules that serve as a wrapper for libgimp, as my platform for extending GIMP.

This post (and any I hopefully follow up with) are meant to track my progress as I learn my way around Python-Fu. Even while writing relatively simple scripts I have encountered gotchas and conflicting information about how to do things. Hopefully some of what I’ve discovered scouring both the web and Python source code will save other developers the time and frustration I’ve already paid.

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Dec 092016
 

GIMP logo

For several years now, Adobe Photoshop has been the sole reason that I have continued to run Mac OS X. During that time, I have done the majority of my work in an Ubuntu instance running in a Parallels virtual machine. I’ve finally bitten the bullet and installed Ubuntu as the primary operating system on my MacBook Pro. I couldn’t be more pleased with how the transition has gone, and I regret not doing it earlier.

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Nov 282016
 

Minority Report

Set 38 years in the future, the plot of 2002’s blockbuster film Minority Report revolves around Washington DC’s PreCrime unit, a police force who able to stop future murders from happening with the aid of three mutant human who are able to predict homicides before they happen.  Minority Report managed to side step the “psychic predicts a murder” cliché storyline with its innovative use of technology: not only could precogs predict future murders, but their visions could be streamed via a neural bridge in the form of a video that the police officers could watch. Fantastical? Nope, and researchers from MIT already have a jump on the technology.

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Nov 142016
 

Osram Scanning LIDARLIDAR (LIght Detecting And Ranging) sensors play a critical role in almost all autonomous and semiautonomous vehicles. Using lasers and relatively simple time of flight calculations, LIDAR can very accurately measure distances and generate detailed 3D maps of environments, but traditionally the best performing systems have been large and very expensive. German lighting manufacturer Osram Opto Semiconductors unveiled their new 4 channel LIDAR package last week, and its price and size is set to shake up the market.

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Nov 012016
 

Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)

In the course of troubleshooting a pseudo-distributed mode installation of Apache Hadoop on my Ubuntu 16.04 vm, one of the tips I stumbled across suggested disabling IPv6.

For any networking neophytes, Internet Protocol version 6, aka IPv6, is the most recent version of the Internet Protocol (IP), the system governing the assignment of addresses to networks and computers on the Internet. IPv6 was created to replace IPv4 which, why still predominantly used by most systems, is quickly running out available addresses. Unlike IPv4, which is a 32 bit addressing scheme offering 2^{32} or roughly 4.3 billion addresses, IPv6 addresses are 128 bits, meaning that there are theoretically 2^{128} or roughly 3.4 \times 10^{38} addresses.

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Sep 212016
 

 

Earth Marble

Participating in the World’s Biggest Marble Hunt has been an amazing experience for me and my family. It is no exaggeration to say that it is as much fun for me to hide marbles and dole out clues as it is to hunt for them in the wild. That said, my family and I have found some truly spectacular marbles. I am consistently stunned by their beauty and the artisanship that went to creating them.

Like my children, I love them all equally, but again like my children, one will always outshine the rest.* This week I found that marble, a Geoffrey Beetem Earth marble, hidden here in Carlisle by the artist himself. Geoffrey Beetem is a world class master glass artist with few peers.

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Jul 262016
 

Binary NumbersIn the last post, we saw that one of the major failings of the signed magnitude representation was that addition and subtraction could not be performed on the same hardware as for unsigned integers. As I pointed out, the reason for this is because negating a number in signed magnitude does not yield the additive inverse of that number. The ones complement representation eliminates this issue, although it does introduce new, subtle issues, and [spoiler] doesn’t address the problem of having two representations for zero.

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