Nov 282016
 

Minority Report

Set 38 years in the future, the plot of 2002’s blockbuster film Minority Report revolves around Washington DC’s PreCrime unit, a police force who able to stop future murders from happening with the aid of three mutant human who are able to predict homicides before they happen.  Minority Report managed to side step the “psychic predicts a murder” cliché storyline with its innovative use of technology: not only could precogs predict future murders, but their visions could be streamed via a neural bridge in the form of a video that the police officers could watch. Fantastical? Nope, and researchers from MIT already have a jump on the technology.

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Nov 142016
 

Osram Scanning LIDARLIDAR (LIght Detecting And Ranging) sensors play a critical role in almost all autonomous and semiautonomous vehicles. Using lasers and relatively simple time of flight calculations, LIDAR can very accurately measure distances and generate detailed 3D maps of environments, but traditionally the best performing systems have been large and very expensive. German lighting manufacturer Osram Opto Semiconductors unveiled their new 4 channel LIDAR package last week, and its price and size is set to shake up the market.

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Nov 012016
 

Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)

In the course of troubleshooting a pseudo-distributed mode installation of Apache Hadoop on my Ubuntu 16.04 vm, one of the tips I stumbled across suggested disabling IPv6.

For any networking neophytes, Internet Protocol version 6, aka IPv6, is the most recent version of the Internet Protocol (IP), the system governing the assignment of addresses to networks and computers on the Internet. IPv6 was created to replace IPv4 which, why still predominantly used by most systems, is quickly running out available addresses. Unlike IPv4, which is a 32 bit addressing scheme offering 2^{32} or roughly 4.3 billion addresses, IPv6 addresses are 128 bits, meaning that there are theoretically 2^{128} or roughly 3.4 \times 10^{38} addresses.

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